Caixin

Age of Empires: What Qin and Han Dynasty Treasures Tell About Artistic Influences Along Silk Road

By Sheila Melvin
The Terracotta Army is a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210–209 BCE and whose purpose was to protect the emperor in his afterlife. Photo: The Met
The Terracotta Army is a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210–209 BCE and whose purpose was to protect the emperor in his afterlife. Photo: The Met

In his May 14 keynote address at the opening ceremony of the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation, Chinese President Xi Jinping extolled the glories of the ancient Silk Road and noted its roots in the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.- A.D. 220).

“Around 140 B.C.,” Xi said, “Zhang Qian, a royal emissary, left Chang'an, capital of the Han Dynasty. He traveled westward on a mission of peace and opened an overland route linking the East and the West, a daring undertaking which came to be known as Zhang Qian's journey to the Western regions.”

You've accessed an article available only to subscribers
Try 4 weeks for $0.99
SUBSCRIBE
Share this article
Open WeChat and scan the QR code
Copyright ?2017 Caixin Global Limited. All Rights Reserved.