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SOCIETY & CULTURE

Cultural Crusaders Keep Spring Festival Traditions Alive

People buy traditional handmade pinwheels at Changdian Temple Fair in Beijing during last year's Lunar New Year holiday. The annual fair, which dates back to the Ming dynasty which ruled from 1368 to 1644, was stopped during World War II and was revived after a long hiatus in 2001, but many people have long complained that its now become commercialized. Photo: VCG
People buy traditional handmade pinwheels at Changdian Temple Fair in Beijing during last year's Lunar New Year holiday. The annual fair, which dates back to the Ming dynasty which ruled from 1368 to 1644, was stopped during World War II and was revived after a long hiatus in 2001, but many people have long complained that its now become commercialized. Photo: VCG

Are Chinese Lunar New Year traditions dying? While many young people complain the country’s biggest festival is losing its “authentic feel,” some small groups — both young and old — are quietly working to revive some traditions that are on the verge of disappearing.

“Chinese people are starting to value traditional culture and are becoming increasingly confident, especially after learning a lot from other developed countries since the opening-up policy, when many Chinese were more inclined to adopt Western culture and festivals,” said Yin Hubin, a folk customs researcher at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

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