Caixin
Caixin Global – Latest China News & Headlines

Home >

TRENDING
China Mainland Leads U.S. in Fortune Global 500 Companies But Trails in Profitability
Trending in China: Tencent – Fighting Youth Unemployment or Enemy of Older Workers?
Tencent Music to Establish Joint Venture with Universal Music
LATEST
Alibaba’s Zhang Yong Tops 2020 Forbes China Best CEOs List
Trending: Family Feud Raises Big Questions Over Succession in China’s Multi-Million “Family” Businesses
Shanghai-Listed Foxconn Internet’s Cloud Service Sales Up 4% in First Half of 2020
U.S.-Listed Chinese Companies Nio and Huya Have Something to Cheer About
Apple Edges Huawei Out of No. 1 in Quarterly Tablet Shipments
Chinese Finance Platform Lufax Files for U.S. IPO of up to $3 Billion
China Mainland Leads U.S. in Fortune Global 500 Companies But Trails in Profitability
Trending in China: Tencent – Fighting Youth Unemployment or Enemy of Older Workers?
Tencent Pushes for Merger That Would Create $10 Billion Chinese Twitch
Tencent Music to Establish Joint Venture with Universal Music
Trending: How U.S.-China Relations Are Causing Netizens to Read the Small Print as Rumors Fly
Qualcomm Lobbies U.S. to Resume Chip Sales to Huawei
Trending in China: Excited About Returning to College Campuses? Not So Quick With Covid-19 Controls
Twitter Joins Microsoft as Another Possible Purchaser of TikTok’s U.S. Business: Report
Electric-Car Maker XPeng Files for U.S. IPO
Xiaomi Still Top Dog in Indian Smartphone Market Despite Tensions
Trending in China: Can You Really Launch a Company Without Saying What it Does?
China’s WeWork rival Ucommune withdraws $100m US IPO, eyes backdoor listing
SMIC Profits Soar to $138m in Second Quarter
Foldable Phone-Maker Plans Shenzhen IPO, Dispelling Rumors of U.S. Listing

By Teng Jing Xuan / Nov 20, 2018 05:57 PM / Politics & Law

Quanzhou, Fujian province, where the chemical spill occurred.

Quanzhou, Fujian province, where the chemical spill occurred.

During a trip to cover a recent petrochemical spill in Fujian province, Caixin reporter Zhou Chen was followed by local officials and had four police officers burst into her hotel room just before she was about to fall asleep.

Zhou isn’t the only reporter to have been shadowed and harassed by local governments in China. It’s now “normal” for journalists to have “company” on reporting trips, Liang Yingfei, another reporter for Caixin writes (link in Chinese):

“Once, when I was out interviewing a source in Changbai, Jilin province, staff at my hotel told me to return immediately to the hotel because there was a leak in my room. When I got there, I found local government officials waiting for me in the lobby.”

Another time, Liang was in Jiangxi reporting on local funeral reforms that had resulted in thousands of coffins being destroyed, with some elderly people committing suicide because they wanted to die before a ban on traditional funerals came into effect. “I interviewed some elderly residents in their homes. Afterwards, local officials followed me from the village back to the city, which was 30 kilometers away,” she wrote.

“One young man I spoke with in Jiangxi, whose father had recently died, became the subject of frequent questioning by local officials after he appeared in my story... He (later) messaged me on WeChat: ‘Do you have any idea how much trouble this has caused me?’ I didn’t know how to respond and could only try to console him by explaining that interviewing and being interviewed are not illegal things.”

The Quanzhou Public Security Bureau has since published an apology for what happened to Zhou.

 


Share this article
Open WeChat and scan the QR code